\r\n As I reflect back on Hurricane Katrina, I can remember feelings of intense uncertainty. Upon reaching my first destination which was Monroeville Alabama, I had an unending urge to fix myself in front of any available television set. As I began to focus on the television, listening aggressively without any possibility of distraction, as nothing else was more important than consuming every bit of news I could possibly retain. I sat motionless for hours at a time without moving from my position. The horrifying pictures of houses under water, was more than I had imagined. It was incredibly unbelievable. \r\n\r\nOnce I saw the city under water, not knowing the condition of my own home that made me quite uneasy. I lived in a two-story home in, but after looking at the pictures on the news, all I was able to see were rooftops. I was immensely concerned about the safety of my husband, who stayed behind. I was unable to speak with him for four days. I did not know what to expect. I really did not know whiter he was dead or alive. I began to rely upon God whom I trust, that he was alive. Once I finally heard from him, I learned that the water in our home was at a level higher than I am tall. That did not help much either. \r\n\r\nFrom Monroeville, my final destination landed me in Ohio, where my husband I reunited. I remained in Ohio for seven months, after which I journeyed back to the city of New Orleans, where we began to piece our living situation back together one day at a time. When my husband drove me into the city, I began to weep at the devastation, as it was not anything that I had ever seen before. I began to weep for all the lives that were lost. It was really heart wrenching. I thank God for another opportunity to live for him. My prayer goes out to all who lost loved ones in Hurricane Katrina. It is my earnest prayer that restoration will eventually come for everyone.\r\n\r\n Catherine Brown\r\n

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Citation

Catherine Brown, “[Untitled],” Hurricane Digital Memory Bank, accessed February 21, 2018, http://www.hurricanearchive.org/items/show/35664.